Should native plants be used in landscaping? (Discussion)

Should native plants be used in landscaping? (Discussion)

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Clip Guide

Clip Guide

: Here you will find clear descriptions of what you just saw, how they know what they said they knew, why they know it to be trustworthy information. Finally we will ask the question, "So what!" and explore why the information is important.

WHAT do we know?

Following Dr. Reichard’s 1994 lecture on invasive plants, “What makes a species a successful invader?” a group of other scientists and other professionals from similar fields discuss the difficulties in trying to encourage ecologically conscious planting.  They consider examples of successful promotion of the use of native plants in gardens and restoration and challenges to planting natives mindfully as well as challenges to determining which plants are native and risks associated with the promotion of native plants.

HOW do we know?

Scientific questions sometimes directly overlap with public actions. In this discussion, scientists are debating what types of planting practices are most likely to help preserve native ecosystems while still meeting public needs and interests, such as the desire for aesthetically-pleasing gardens or effective restoration species.

WHY can this be trusted?

Discussion and critique of scientific ideas form an important part of the scientific process. By opening their ideas and methods to critique, scientists like Dr. Reichard are able to develop hypotheses and action plans that offer a complex understanding of challenges and opportunities related to their studies.

SO WHAT?

Introduced plants can become invasive in local ecosystems, outcompeting local species1.  As shown in the associated chart, many of these introductions originate from gardens or other landscape planting. Studies such as Dr. Reichard’s and discussions like the one shown in this clip seek to create practical ways to help reduce introduction of invasive species while still considering the needs and interests of planters.

 

1Reichard, S., & Gardens, B. (2008, October). The Five Stages of Grief: Invasive Plants and the Horticulture Industry. In California Invasive Plant Council Symposium 2008 (p. 3).

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Further Reading
Further Reading: 

Reichard, S., & Gardens, B. (2008, October). The Five Stages of Grief: Invasive Plants and the Horticulture Industry. In California Invasive Plant Council Symposium 2008 (p. 3).